10.25.16 B-Day

Science  Period 2 and 3

Warm Up: We looked at graphs of weather and climate. We discussed the features of these graphs that make them about weather vs. climate. Here are the examples with reasoning: weather-or-climate-graphs

In general, graphs about weather will focus on specific conditions for a given period of time. Graphs about climate will focus on average conditions or “normal” conditions.

Main  Activity: Students spent the period working on the properties of air stations.

HW – Review the difference between weather and climate for a summative test on the difference between the two during the next class.

 

Science Period 4

In class we reviewed the difference between weather and climate. Here are some descriptions of the difference developed by students and myself:

  • Weather is what we observe occurring in the atmosphere at any given moment. It can change from day to day. For example, there can be precipitationtoday and warmer temperatures tomorrow. Climate is the typical weather expected season to season in a given area. It is based on an average of years of weather observations. Using climate, we can predict the weather month to month.
  • Weather is short term, like the precipitation last week while sunny and warm temperature this week. Climate is long term such as how scientists use 30 years of observations to describe weather. Climate is what a season or location is typically is. For example, winter is snowy and summer is hot.
  • Weather is what’s happening in the hour, week, or day. Climate is more general than weather. Climate is what happens during different seasons. Climate is more general than weather, it is what more typically happens. Weather is a day to day basis.
  • The difference between weather and climate is that climate is the average or typical conditions for a location. Weather is the conditions observed for a moment, like the day, or other type of time.
  • Weather is how the atmosphere is behaving over a short period of time, like a week, days, hours, or minutes. Climate is the average weather over a long period of time, like months or years. There are climates for seasons and locations. For example, the climate for Portland in the winter season is typically weather with lots of precipitation and lower temperatures.

We then spent the rest of the period going over our “Properties of Air” exploration stations (new activity).

Homework: review weather vs. climate. There will be a summative at the end of the week on the difference.

Academy

Project research day.

DUE AT THE END OF THE WEEK: citations for at least 3 articles related to your topic. At least 3 notes for each of the 4 focus areas for research.

10.24.16 A Day

Science Period 1, 2, and 3

In class we reviewed the difference between weather and climate. Here are some descriptions of the difference developed by students and myself:

  • Weather is what we observe occurring in the atmosphere at any given moment. It can change from day to day. For example, there can be precipitation today and warmer temperatures tomorrow. Climate is the typical weather expected season to season in a given area. It is based on an average of years of weather observations. Using climate, we can predict the weather month to month.
  • Weather is short term, like the precipitation last week while sunny and warm temperature this week. Climate is long term such as how scientists use 30 years of observations to describe weather. Climate is what a season or location is typically is. For example, winter is snowy and summer is hot.
  • Weather is what’s happening in the hour, week, or day. Climate is more general than weather. Climate is what happens during different seasons. Climate is more general than weather, it is what more typically happens. Weather is a day to day basis.
  • The difference between weather and climate is that climate is the average or typical conditions for a location. Weather is the conditions observed for a moment, like the day, or other type of time.
  • Weather is how the atmosphere is behaving over a short period of time, like a week, days, hours, or minutes. Climate is the average weather over a long period of time, like months or years. There are climates for seasons and locations. For example, the climate for Portland in the winter season is typically weather with lots of precipitation and lower temperatures.

We then spent the rest of the period going over our “Properties of Air” exploration stations (new activity).

Homework: review weather vs. climate. There will be a summative at the end of the week on the difference.

Academy

In class we looked into the different terms for inquiry and engineering project. Handout:

iv-dv-experimental-setup

Handouts from last week:

Inquiry Research Plan

Engineering Research Plan

HW – Brainstorm your own experimental set up or engineering set up.

10.21.16 E-Day

Science All Classes

In class students took a “plickers” quiz about weather vs climate. This is a new online tool that allows the class to respond and then for me to display a graph of the responses to the questions. What each student selected remains anonymous. I then have the students discuss what the answer could possibly be and record notes on their reasoning. The final quiz score is adjusted to passing as long as students took notes on why the correct answer was correct.

HW – PERIOD 4 NEEDS TO TURN IN PERMISSION SLIPS ON MONDAY FOR OUR COMMUNITY SERVICE FIELD TRIP ON WEDNESDAY

D-Day 10.20.16

Science Period 1, 2, and 4

Warm Up: We discussed what was correct and incorrect about the following statement: “Weather is how the atmosphere acts over a short period of time. The weather isn’t always predictable. It can be anything.” After conversation, we discussed the accuracy of each sentence:

1 – Weather is how the atmosphere acts over short periods of time, moment to moment. We can have similar weather over several days or possibly even weeks, but it still shows small changes from hour to hour.

2 – While you can predict the weather, there’s predictions don’t always EXACTLY match the real weather that is observed.

3. The weather CANNOT be anything. It is “bound” by the climate and season. For example, it is not going to snow in August in West Linn. It’s not going to be 100 degrees one day in December. But places with different climates might see snow in August (like Alaska)

CLASS NOTES ON WEATHER VS. CLIMATE:

Weather

  • Short term conditions in the atmosphere
  • In the moment.
  • The climate for the area puts “bounds” on the possible weather.

Climate

  • General conditions in a given area
    • Area can be large scale – Pacific Northwest vs. the Eastern US for example. Big differences will be seen in the climate.
    • Area can be small scale – Southern Oregon coast vs. Northern Oregon coast for example. Eastern Oregon vs. Western Oregon for example. Smaller differences will be seen in the climate.

HOMEWORK – Study Weather vs. Climate for check in tomorrow and a summative next week.

FURTHER READING ON CLIMATE vs. WEATHER: reading-weather-and-climate

ACADEMY

We organized our research notes into different categories: Value of Project, General Background Info, Methods of Related Studies, Findings of Related Studies.

I handed out an instruction sheet for making the research plan:

Inquiry Research Plan

Engineering Research Plan

 

10.18.17 B-Day

Science Period 2 and 3

In science class students finished up working on the water cycle summative. Afterward, we explored the weather chamber again.

HW – Provide 2 observations and 2 inferences per weather chamber section. Also include sketches of water you observed in each box. See my previous post for the video of the weather chamber.

Science Period 4

In class students started their water cycle summative. Click on this link to access the scoring guide rubric used for grading the assignment:

http://blogs.acms.wlwv.k12.or.us/staff/JonesJ/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Water-Cycle-Summative.docx

For the 2nd half of the period, we explored the “weather chamber.” Here is a video of the weather chamber:

Homework: Review water cycle as you will finish your summative work on the water cycle tomorrow.

Academy

In class we continued to research about our topic. Due Thursday – 3 notes in each research category. (See previous post for more info) http://blogs.acms.wlwv.k12.or.us/staff/WalshS/?p=2012

10.17.16 – A Day

Science Period 1, 2, and 3

In class students started their water cycle summative. Click on this link to access the scoring guide rubric used for grading the assignment:

http://blogs.acms.wlwv.k12.or.us/staff/JonesJ/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Water-Cycle-Summative.docx

For the 2nd half of the period, we explored the “weather chamber.” Here is a video of the weather chamber:

Homework: Review water cycle as you will finish your summative work on the water cycle tomorrow.

Academy

In class students continue to research about their topic.

DUE THURSDAY: Notecards with notes from AT LEAST 3 different resources using the RESEARCH DIRECTIONS:

  1. Find at least one source that explains the value of your experiment/engineering project. The source(s) should explain why this topic is important.
  1. Find at least one source for the basic reference knowledge needed. This source should give general knowledge about terms and concepts related to your topic. Often this will be a textbook or other print (book) resource.
  1. Find at least one source about the methods used in projects of this type. How did other scientists/engineers carry out their study?
  1. Find at least one source about the findings of a related experiment or engineering design project. This source will make it clear what other people learned.

 

10.12.16 E-Day

Science All Classes

Warm Up: sorting the water cycle terms into groups of those where gravity or changes in temperature moves water through that part of the cycle.

Main Activity: Groups summarized how climate change is altering their part of the water cycle and then shared that out with the whole class.

Notes: Here are summarized changes for each part –

  • Glaciers: Less precipitation as snow and increased melts/evaporation means glaciers are shrinking. Water remains trapped in glaciers less.
  • Lakes: Warmer water temperatures means increased evaporation from lakes. Depending on the location, some lakes will grow with increased precipitation while others will shrink with less precipitation happening in the area where those lakes exist.
  • Rivers: Increased flooding from rivers as rainfall events become more intense. Increased drought conditions at other times. Increased water temperatures means more evaporation from rivers.
  • Atmosphere: Increase in the atmosphere’s ability to hold water. Heavier precipitation events.
  • Oceans: Increased evaporation because of increased temperatures. However, sea levels will rise because of increased runoff from the land along with glacier and ice cap melt.
  • Groundwater: water remains underground less as people pump water to the surface more often to feed thirsty plants and animals. Once at the surface, water is more likely to evaporate and not return to groundwater.
  • Soils: Decrease in the ability for soils to hold onto water, increased evaporation from soils without plants on them. However, some locations will see increased plant growth, covering the ground and increasing soil’s ability to hold water. So this one is a mixed outcome.
  • Plants: Increased transpiration from plants is possible, but some more recent scientific research found plants in environments with more CO2 in the air did less transpiration.

Wednesday 10.11 – E Day

Period 1 – 4, no Academy today.

In class students worked on the climate change water cycle game modifications.

Homework – Finish water cycle game “Part 2”

Handout – watercyclegamequestions

Water cycle game stations needed to answer question 2 in part 2 – climatechangewatercyclestations

Week of 10/3 to 10/7

A Day

Period 1, 2, and 3

Warm Up:

Directions: Read the scenarios below. Then explain in your journal which student you agree with most and why. If you don’t agree with any of them, explain your idea. If you partially agree with an idea below, explain how you would change it to fully agree.

A few students are discussing what happens to water when it rains on the baseball field. Here are their ideas:

Student A: All of the water hits the ground and flows off the surface into the gutter. Some of it might form puddles, if the ground is flat or formed like a bowl.

Student B: Most of the water soaks into the ground. Once it is in the ground, most of the water continues to flow downward because of gravity.

Student C: The water soaks into the ground where it stays until the plants soak it up and evaporate it out their leaves; this is called transpiration. If it rains faster than the plants can soak it up, puddles form.

In Class – Graphing water cycle game data and starting analysis. Also a water cycle term practice

HW – Study Water Cycle Terms

B-Day

Period 4

Warm Up:

Directions: Read the scenarios below. Then explain in your journal which student you agree with most and why. If you don’t agree with any of them, explain your idea. If you partially agree with an idea below, explain how you would change it to fully agree.

A few students are discussing what happens to water when it rains on the baseball field. Here are their ideas:

Student A: All of the water hits the ground and flows off the surface into the gutter. Some of it might form puddles, if the ground is flat or formed like a bowl.

Student B: Most of the water soaks into the ground. Once it is in the ground, most of the water continues to flow downward because of gravity.

Student C: The water soaks into the ground where it stays until the plants soak it up and evaporate it out their leaves; this is called transpiration. If it rains faster than the plants can soak it up, puddles form.

In Class – Graphing water cycle game data and starting analysis. Also a water cycle term practice

HW- Study Water Cycle Terms

Period 2 and 3

Warm Up: Write a short story of a molecule of water traveling through at least three locations of the water cycle.

In class – Analyzing water cycle game and completing the questions on the worksheet.

Handout – Water Cycle Game Questions watercyclegamequestions

HW – Study Water Cycle Terms. Finish answering all water cycle game handout questions EXCEPT question 6.

C – Day

Period 1 and 4

Warm Up: Write a short story of a molecule of water traveling through at least three locations of the water cycle.

In class – Analyzing water cycle game and completing the questions on the worksheet.

Handout – Water Cycle Game Questions part 1 watercyclegamequestions

HW – Study Water Cycle Terms. Finish answering all water cycle game handout questions EXCEPT question 6.

Period 3

Warm Up: How do you think the water cycle might change if the average temperature around the globe was warmer from day to day.

In Class: Water cycle vocab game (like taboo) and climate change water cycle research.

Handout – Water Cycle Game Questions part 2 watercyclegamequestions

HW – Study Water Cycle Terms. Quiz on terms this Friday.